Crowds

Because of the sheer vastness of the world wide web network, individual human behavior in this medium closely resembles that of humans in crowds. Sure, there's a slim to none chance that your perverse nature, greediness, dishonesty, and bad taste will be discovered--permanently recorded as an IP address that was encountered by a robot at some time on some axis--but the chance of it actually getting back to you personally is highly unlikely, at least at this point in history, when the network itself has no centralized system of regulation and monitorization.

Canettis Crowds and Power, a work referred to by Deleuze-Guattari. in A Thousand Plateaus is an excellent study of crowd behavior and crowd mentalities which begins with a chapter called “Rhythm” (check fact) that discusses the primary rhythm of the body as it is connected to the act of walking. MUCH MUCH MORE ON THIS.


Distinguish between CROWDS and THRONGS.


“The crowd is the veil through which the familiar city beckons to the flâneur as phantasmagoria—now a landscape, now a room. Both become elements of the department store, which makes use of flânerie itself to sell goods. The department store is the last promenade for the flâneur.” (AP 10)

Compare grocery store scene in White Noise.

See Henry Miller's throng bits-- "I love everything that flows"

See Whitman's bits on the throng.

The Arcades Project Project is part of Heather Marcelle Crickenberger's doctoral dissertation entitled "The Structure of Awakening": Walter Benjamin and Progressive Scholarship in New Media which was defended and passed on June 27, 2007 at the University of South Carolina. The committe members are as follows: John Muckelbauer, Ph.D, Judith James, Ph.D., Dan Smith, Ph.D, Brad Collins, Ph. D., and Anthony Jarrells, Ph.D. Copyright 2007 by Heather Marcelle Crickenberger. All rights reserved. lems concerning what you find here, feel free to contact me at marcelle@thelemming.com. You are also invited to leave a message for me and other visitors HERE. The Arcades Project Project or The Rhetoric of Hypertext